All Posts in Category "Probability and Statistics"

Ten Books for Skeptics

Ten Books for Skeptics

12 December 2012 by Scott Gavura

There are probably as many paths to becoming a scientific skeptic as there are skeptics. Admittedly my framework for skepticism was in the background for decades, but it’s only been over the past several years that I’ve started to really understand skepticism as a way of thinking. It was driven by my work as a […]

Read the full story

Posted in Cognition, Critical Thinking, Logic and Fallacies, Probability and Statistics, Reviews, Skepticism, Social Sciences16 Comments

What We’re Reading

What We’re Reading

16 August 2011 by Scott Gavura

  It’s the lazy days of summer, folks. We’re thinking skeptically, but let’s just say we’ve been, well, distracted. Here’s what we’ve been reading, dockside. Homeopathy Homeopathic manufacturer Boiron is threatening to sue an Italian blogger regarding the homeopathic remedy Oscillococcinum, claiming posts are “defamatory”  Here’s his blog, translated into English. In yet another example […]

Read the full story

Posted in Alternative Medicine, Diet and Nutrition, Probability and Statistics, Skepticism2 Comments

Canucks Win The Cup in Game Five !!!

Canucks Win The Cup in Game Five !!!

16 June 2011 by Erik Davis

It must be true. A little bird told me. That little bird of course was Cosmo the Amazon Parrot of the Vancouver Aquarium, who went on CBC and Global a few weeks back to predict a quick win by Vancouver. Watch: A Strong Track Record? At the time, it seemed reasonable to trust Cosmo – […]

Read the full story

Posted in Canada, Cognition, Critical Thinking, Culture, Logic and Fallacies, Media, Probability and Statistics, Skepticism1 Comment

scale part 2

Evaluating The Evidence for Cell Phones and WiFi

02 June 2011 by Michael Kruse

Picking up where I left off yesterday, here is a short discussion about the application of  the Precautionary Principle and the Weight of Evidence approach to evaluating scientific claims. The Precautionary Principle In many discussions of the “dangers” of WiFi and cell phones, the precautionary principle is evoked. It is the idea that we have […]

Read the full story

Posted in Critical Thinking, Health, Health Policy, Probability and Statistics, Skepticism21 Comments

A Brief Primer on Criminal Statistics

A Brief Primer on Criminal Statistics

19 April 2011 by Dianne Sousa

During elections my ears perk up when law and order issues come up. Are politicians doing business differently this time round? Do they show that they understand what they’re talking about? The claims thrown around in these discussions deserve careful scrutiny because the data that they depend on are often ambiguous or misleading. Surprise! The evidence […]

Read the full story

Posted in Canada, Critical Thinking, Probability and Statistics, Social Sciences4 Comments

Book Review: Future Babble by Dan Gardner

Book Review: Future Babble by Dan Gardner

04 February 2011 by Darren McKee

Today’s guest post is from Darren McKee, an contributor to the Ottawa Skeptics podcast. Want to contribute a review? Contact us. I predict that you will find this review informative. If you do, you will congratulate my foresight. If you don’t, you’ll forget I was wrong. My playful intro summarizes the main thesis of Gardner’s […]

Read the full story

Posted in Critical Thinking, Culture, Probability and Statistics, Reviews, Skepticism5 Comments

Judge Gets the Science Right

Judge Gets the Science Right

15 September 2010 by Marion Kilgour

Back in November, I wrote a post about Canadian Blood Services (CBS), and their indefinite ban on donations from men who have had sex with men (MSM). The point of the post was that an indefinite ban is not supported by science. Well, the ruling for Canadian Blood Services v. Kyle Freeman is in, and […]

Read the full story

Posted in Canada, Health, Health Policy, Probability and Statistics1 Comment

A Bed Bug

All About Bed Bugs

03 September 2010 by Chris Hebbern

The bed bug resurgence Bed bugs, Cimex lectularius, have been infesting human habitations for thousands of years. About the size of an apple seed, the bugs can hide in electronics, such as radios, in drawers, in and under furniture, behind baseboards, under loose wallpaper, behind paintings and posters, in small cracks and in the curtains. They […]

Read the full story

Posted in Canada, Critical Thinking, Health, Logic and Fallacies, Media, Medical Conditions, Ontario, Probability and Statistics, Science, Skepticism12 Comments

We Don’t Govern on the Basis of Statistics

We Don’t Govern on the Basis of Statistics

24 August 2010 by Marion Kilgour

In the past three months, the Harper government has said some things about statistics that are blatantly wrong and received some media attention, which is a bit unusual. What things did the government say, and were they actually correct? First, in June the government announced that it would be replacing the mandatory long form census […]

Read the full story

Posted in Canada, Critical Thinking, Economics, Probability and Statistics8 Comments

Common Sense: A Manifesto

Common Sense: A Manifesto

24 June 2010 by Erik Davis

Recently, I filed a post about food allergies in the schoolyard, which was driven by catching myself in several common logical fallacies. You see, before writing the article, I had a general sense that school policies designed to protect allergic kids from peanut exposure were getting out of hand. After all, back when I was […]

Read the full story

Posted in Cognition, Critical Thinking, History, Logic and Fallacies, Probability and Statistics, Science, Skepticism12 Comments